Archives: NorthWrite 2012

NorthWrite 2012  was a writing festival organised by the Northland branch of the New Zealand Society of Authors, taking place in Whangarei 7-9 September 2012.

The festival included award-winning and top-selling authors, illustrators and artists from New Zealand and Australia who addressed the theme “The Business of Writing” from various perspectives and experiences.

A variety of people attended —  writers, whether experienced or just starting out; illustrators and other visual artists; and anyone who enjoys a good story in any form. Discussions and workshops appealed to writers across genres and with different personal and professional goals.

From historical fiction writer Deborah Challinor to poet Paula Green, from journalist Joe Bennett to illustrator Fifi Colston, this conference included something for everyone. The full programme of workshops included the basics of writing (from grammar to self-editing to preparing your manuscript for publication), performance and delivery, marketing and social media, illustration and picture book, non-fiction and poetry, historical fiction and children’s literature.

If you are interested in finding out more about the New Zealand Society of Authors, please go to the NZSA website  for information about the Society, its members and also new membership opportunities.

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NorthWrite 2012 was made possible in part through generous funding by Creative New Zealand.

Here we bring you a summary of the participants and events.

PRESENTERS

Fifi Colston

Fifi Colston

Fifi Colston has a richly varied career as a writer, illustrator, poet, Wearable Art Designer, film costumer and occasional columnist. She has illustrated 33 books for trade and education and for many years she has presented arts and crafts firstly on the children’s television programme What Now, and later on the Good Morning show (TV1). Her 2nd novel Janie Olive: a recipe for disaster! was a CLFNZ Notable Book Junior Fiction for 2006 as was her 3rd, Glory which was also a Esther Glen Award 2010 finalist in the 2010 LIANZAs. As well as serving as the President of the New Zealand Illustrators’ Guild, she has been a New Zealand Post Book Awards judge, Convener of the Wellington Children’s Book Association and is currently a Wellington committee member for the Storylines Festival. Workshops: Illustration & How To Front Up

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Paula Green

Paula Green

Paula Green is a poet, reviewer, anthologist and children’s author. She also has a doctorate in Italian literature. Paula has published seven poetry collections including several for children. She reviews poetry for the New Zealand Herald and visits schools regularly. Co-written with Harry Ricketts, her book 99 Ways into New Zealand Poetry was short-listed for the 2010 NZ Post Book Awards. She has recently edited Dear Heart: 150 New Zealand Love Poems and is a judge for the 2012 NZ Post Book Awards, has edited Best NZ Poems and judged the NZ Post Secondary School Poetry competition. Her new collection of poems, The Baker’s Thumbprint, will be published next year. Workshop: Making Poems Matter

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Deborah Challinor

Deborah Challinor

Deborah Challinor is a writer and a historian. She was born in the Waikato town of Huntly and attended Waikato University where she completed a Ph.D in New Zealand military history in 1998. She originally went to university to study English but didn’t actually like it and changed her major to History. Clearly the decision was meant to be, as all of her historical novels have appeared in the top five of the New Zealand fiction bestseller list, six reaching number one. Deborah currently lives with her husband in Newcastle, Australia, where she is researching and writing a series of novels for HarperCollins Australia, set in Sydney in the early 1830s about four convict girls transported from England. The first, Behind the Sun, is scheduled to be released in December, 2012. The second, Girl of Shadows, will be released the following year. Workshop: Historical Fiction & Special Event: An Evening With Deborah Challinor


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Kyle Mewburn

Kyle Mewburn

Kyle Mewburn’s books have been published in thirteen countries and won numerous awards. Old Hu-hu won the 2010 New Zealand Post Children’s Book of the Year. Kiss! Kiss! Yuck! Yuck!  won the 2007 New Zealand Post Best Picture Book and Children’s Choice awards, as well as a Flicker Tale award in North Dakota. Other titles include Duck’s stuck!, Hill & Hole (both finalists in the NZ Post Awards), Hester & Lester, Moon Cow, Melu and Seesaw Po. He has also written numerous junior fiction titles, including his best-selling Dinosaur Rescue series.  Originally from Brisbane, Kyle lives with his wife, Marion, a well-known potter, in a house with a grass roof in the middle of nowhere in the far south of the South Island. When he’s not writing, Kyle is either in his garden singing to his veggies, in the creek swimming or off exploring the strange land he’s discovered at the back of his wardrobe … although that last bit may not be completely true. Workshop: Picture Book

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Joe Bennett

Joe Bennett

Joe Bennett was brought up in southern England and graduated from Cambridge with a lowly degree in English. He came to New Zealand to teach for a year in 1987 and is still here. Since 1998 he has made his living by writing. His newspaper columns are syndicated throughout the country. He has published over 20 books — seven of them worldwide with Simon and Schuster UK — and has been translated into Chinese, Korean, Greek and American. Workshop: Telling the Truth: How to Write Good Non-Fiction


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David Hill

David Hill

David Hill has been a fulltime writer for thirty years. His books include novels and plays for children, teenagers and adults. He has been published in ten countries and won various awards in New Zealand and overseas. He writes short stories and book reviews and has been a columnist for various publications. His most recent books include a picture-book with Fifi Colston, The Red Poppy (Scholastic), and a YA novel, My Brother’s War (Puffin). Workshops: Writing from Life’s Mistakes & Playing the Field

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Lorraine Steele

Lorraine Steele

Lorraine Steele has been in the entertainment industry all her working life. After ten years distributing and publicising New Zealand movies, she followed her passion for books and moved to HarperCollins Publishers NZ where she worked for ten years as Publicity Manager. In 2008 Lorraine started up her own freelance PR business and now enjoys the diversity of working with large and small publishing houses and an increasing number of self-published authors. Workshop: Market Yourself & Your Book

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Rae Roadley

Rae Roadley

Rae Roadley worked in publishing and public relations and attended countless creative writing courses before she qualified as a journalist. She was a TVNZ new media subeditor before moving to Whangarei, her hometown, to report for the daily newspaper. After falling for a farmer, Rex Roadley, she moved to his farm on the Kaipara Harbour and began freelance writing. After being charged in quick succession by a couple of bulls, she started writing newspaper columns about rural life. Feedback from readers inspired her to write a memoir, Love at the End of the Road. Workshop: Market Yourself & Your Book


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Catherine Arrow

Catherine Arrow

Catherine Arrow has been involved with writing in one form or another all her working life, starting her career as a journalist in the UK before heading into public relations. She moved online with the advent of the web and has been helping people with digital engagement ever since. After working in the public and private sectors, Catherine ran an award-winning public relations consultancy in the UK before arriving in New Zealand in 2005.

Since then she has juggled various working hats, including design and delivery of professional development programmes for the Public Relations Institute of New Zealand (PRINZ), lecturing at various universities, working as a consultant on digital communication and strategy, regularly blogging and – out-of-hours – quietly feeding her passion as a closet poet. A Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Public Relations, she is currently Secretary of the Global Alliance for Public Relations and Communication Management. In May this year she was presented with the PRINZ President’s Award which recognises exemplary contribution to PRINZ and the profession by an individual member. Workshop: Social Media for Writers & Illustrators

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Kathy Derrick

Kathy Derrick

Kathy Derrick is the Northland Branch Chair of the NZ Society of Authors and has spearheaded the Northwrite 2012 Festival with help from willing branch members. She writes mainly for children and young adults. Most of her published works are with Learning Media, although she has had success with flash fiction this year.  Her latest projects include tidying up a junior fantasy novel, and reviewing New Zealand children’s books and interviewing their authors at NZ Children’s Book Reviews. She has completed the Northtec Applied Writing Diplomas through to level 7 and values a good critique, both from herself and others, on her writing. She is currently tutoring senior high school students on how to critique their work. Workshop: How To Critique Your Own And Others’ Work

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Michelle Elvy

Michelle Elvy

Michelle Elvy‘s past professional lives have included teacher, historian, translator, travel writer and CEO of a software consulting company. She is the founding editor of New Zealand’s Flash Frontier: An Adventure in Short Fiction and also edits at Blue Five Notebook and A Baker’s Dozen. In June 2012, along with Sian Williams, she coordinated New Zealand’s inaugural National Flash Fiction Day. A Pushcart nominee, Fulbright Scholar and Watson Fellow, Michelle has published articles in travel and sailing magazines, and her poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction can be found in many print and online journals. She is presently working on a collection of very short stories set across historical New Zealand, thanks to a research grant from the NZSA and Auckland Museum Library. Besides writing and editing both short fiction and longer works, Michelle teaches workshops on fiction, self-editing, the mechanics of writing and online creative communities, and she has judged several writing competitions this year. Michelle reads, writes and edits in NZ, British and American English as well as German. As such, she firmly believes in grammar but believes just as much in creativity. She likes rules and drawing outside the lines.  Workshops: How To Critique Your Own And Others’ Work & Grammar Is Your Friend

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Zana Bell

Zana Bell

Zana Bell grew up in Zimbabwe but in her early twenties went travelling and ended up living in a fishing village in Scotland, an Elizabethan hall in England, and on a yacht in Greece before coming to New Zealand where she fell in love. She now lives with her Kiwi family in an idyllic bay with a mountain at her back and a harbor spread before her.

Zana’s  novels have been published in three different genres in New Zealand, Australia, America,  Canada and France. She has also had numerous articles and short stories published in Landfall, New Zealand Geographic, History Scotland, Next, and Grace.  Her stories have also been broadcast on National Radio. Workshop: Preparing Your Manuscript for Publication

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Sarah Gumbley

Sarah Gumbley

Sarah Gumbley is an online communications expert. Currently completing a PhD investigating social media in New Zealand, she also lectures at AUT on media and communications topics. She speaks at a number of workshops and events and runs an online marketing consultancy for small businesses. Workshop: Market Yourself & Your Book

 

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PROGRAMME AND WORKSHOPS

Northwrite2012 Programme

Illustration, Saturday 8 Sept, 9am-1pm (Fifi Colston)

This workshop will look at layering techniques and will show you how Photoshop works with digital collage. You will get to create an illustration using a hands on method simulating the layers and masking techniques that Photoshop uses but in a non digital format. This is the perfect workshop to understand how this media can be used and if you want to use it or stay with more traditional techniques. You will come out of the session with a complete illustration and inspiration for future work.

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Making Poems Matter, Saturday 8 Sept, 9am-1pm (Paula Green)

What makes some poems stand out more than others? What makes certain poems matter to a reader? In this workshop we will do a warm-up exercise, start work on three poems and practice performing poems out loud. There are many things that give poetry that extra special quality, but in this workshop we will explore three key things. We will explore how poems can make music, how poems can come from the heart and how poems can be layered. Paula will give lots of tips and then it will be over to you to choose which tips suit you and what you want your poems to do.

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Historical Fiction, Saturday 8 Sept, 9am-1pm (Deborah Challinor)

This workshop will start with a brainstorming exercise to get participants’ heads into a ‘history’ space, and will then look at:

  • ethics of writing historical fiction
  • useful primary and secondary sources; diaries, artefacts, site visits, art, film, histories,  archives, museums, oral history – and the pros and cons of using them
  • how to integrate historical research into narrative elegantly
  • writing ‘period’ dialogue and dialect, avoiding anachronisms and 21st century povs, and managing the issue of ‘political correctness’

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Picture Book, Saturday 8 Sept, 2pm-5pm (Kyle Mewburn)

Kyle Mewburn’s workshop will start with a discussion about the kind of things that make one story stand out from the rest – and how this very subjective process leads different writers in very different directions. We will address issues such as how to steer plots away from contrived and unsatisfying conclusions, how words can be encouraged to perform minor miracles, and how to add depth and meaning without suffocating the story. If time allows these issues will be related back to the participants’ own work, with an emphasis on finding the heart of their stories.

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Telling the truth: how to write good non-fiction, Saturday 8 Sept, 2pm-5pm (Joe Bennett)

What you say is inseparable from how you say it. And how you say it is a matter of technique. In this workshop we’ll dismember examples of good and bad non-fiction with a view to identifying what makes the good stuff good and the bad bad. It should be instructive. It may be profitable. It will be enjoyable.

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Writing from Life’s Mistakes, Saturday 8 Sept, 2pm-5pm (David Hill)

David Hill will look at ways we can use mishaps, mistakes, misapprehensions (of ourselves and others) as source material for writing. We’ll discuss many examples of such blunders, from the trivial and amusing to the major and moving. We’ll look at ways they can be transformed into pieces of writing. We’ll build a list of topics, start one – possibly two – pieces of writing, and have some feedback on what’s been written. We’ll discuss ways of editing / improving the writing, and we will also look at possible markets for such work. We’ll try to see how such a topic can be applied to fiction for various age-groups, and to non-fiction, drama, even poetry (if we’re lucky). Absolutely no experience is necessary to take part: only a willingness to try some writing and share some ideas.

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Social Media for Writers and Illustrators, Sunday 9 Sept, ALL DAY, 9am-3.30pm (Catherine Arrow)

In this workshop Catherine Arrow will provide  a practical, jargon-free, hands-on session designed to help writers and illustrators get online, understand the digital environment and develop new ways to bring their words and pictures to the world, whether that’s by blog, by Twitter or savvy social networking. Everyone will leave with at least the beginnings of a blog and/or social media page.

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How to Front Up, Sunday 9 Sept, 9am-10.30am (Fifi Colston)

Delivering a workshop or presentation is an essential skill for all writers. It may be a way to supplement your writing income, you may be asked to give a presentation at your book launch, you may be asked to talk at your children or grandchildren’s school, you may be asked to run a mini-workshop for a group of writing colleagues. Fifi is the perfect person to show you how to do this. She has delivered numerous workshops to both adults and children on illustration, writing, craft and Wearable Art; she knows what works. She has featured over the years as a presenter on Good Morning, What Now, poet on National Radio, event MC and Wellington stand up comedian.

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Grammar is your Friend, Sunday 9 Sept, 9am-10.30am (Michelle Elvy)

Grammar is your friend because it’s the glue that holds your story together. This session is not about memorising rules, nor is it about being overly pedantic or draconian. It’s about understanding how good grammar is essential for clarity and ease of flow. Plot, character, setting and mood all matter in a well written piece (whether a short story or longer manuscript, fiction or non-fiction) – and so do the nuts and bolts that hold those things together.  We’ll examine some common pitfalls and present ways to remember how to avoid them. Without bombarding the audience with commas, semicolons and apostrophes, we’ll look at some common misconceptions and focus on how the big picture is important but the details count too. And we’ll do it in a collaborative, convivial way.

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Playing the Field, Sunday 9 Sept, 10.45am-12.45pm (David Hill)

David will talk about how and why he’s tried writing across a number of genres – fiction for various age-groups; non-fiction; plays; the odd (in all senses) poem; bits of journalism. He’ll cover how he got into each, and how other people can do the same. We’ll look at how to get material, where to send it, how to submit. There will be time to start a piece of writing; possibly more, and there will be a chance for feedback. We’ll consider how changing to another genre or form may help with work that wasn’t succeeding in the original form. The emphasis will be on building up lots of topics and a sense of being broad as well as deep. No experience necessary, just the same willingness to try, and to share.

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How to Critique Your Own and Others’ Work, Sunday 9 Sept, 10.45am-12.45pm (Kathy Derrick)

In this workshop we will look at the critique process, applying it to others’ work and also your own. We will give you tips on how you can see your own work through fresh eyes and move towards a polished end product. Gaining critical distance is important to any review process, and we’ll discuss how you can do this as we explore perspectives on reading and reviewing. The review process is as central to good writing as the ideas/ exploration phase. Being a careful reader makes you a better writer — so we’ll begin there and work on how to read your own work and the work of others.

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Market Yourself and Your Book, Sunday 9 Sept, 1.30pm-3.30pm (Lorraine Steele)

Lorraine Steele’s workshop will be an interactive discussion on how to best market yourself and your book. Lorraine will be joined by her business partner, Sarah Gumbley, and successful Northland author, Rae Roadley. Together they will take participants through a hypothetical book marketing exercise as practise for the real thing and will end with a panel discussion where all your marketing questions will be answered.

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Preparing Your Manuscript for Publication, Sunday 9 Sept, 1.30pm-3.30pm (Zana Bell)

You’ve polished your writing till it shines but now what? This workshop will help you take the leap towards submitting your manuscript, short story or article for publication. We will look at identifying markets and approaching editors/agents with enquiry letters, concept pitches and synopses. We will discuss the writer’s journey of acceptance and rejection. Both are opportunities. Note: this is not a workshop on self-publishing.

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AN EVENING WITH DEBORAH CHALLINOR

Deborah Challinor Poster

INTERVIEWS AND REVIEWS

As part of the build-up to NorthWrite 2012 we conducted interviews with a few participants to find out what they’re attending and what they hope to get out of the conference.

Dawa Rowley.

Hi Dawa. Where do you live?

Beside Mt Albert, in Auckland

What kind of writing, reading and/or illustrating do you do yourself?

Non-fiction and poetry.

What workshops have you signed up for?

I’ve been interested for a while in how to make more deeply layered poems, so I’m looking forward to Making Poems Matter with Paula Green. I can’t wait for David Hill on Writing From Life’s Mistakes. (I’ve made so many mistakes and this workshop implies I don’t necessarily have to fix everything up before I write). His class on diversification called Playing the Field also looks useful for an indecisive scribe with too many ideas. I find myself shrinking like a bread bag too close to the toaster when I think about promoting myself and my work but realise it is essential these days so I’m hoping Lorraine Steele’s Market Yourself and Your Book and Fifi Colson’s How to Front Up may chip a fair sized chunk off my aversion to attention. (It took quite a large gulp and a great dollop of goodwill towards the folk organising this conference for me to agree to this interview!)

What writing/illustration workshops have you previously attended in Northland? (Who taught them/ where did they take place/ when?)

Diploma of Applied Writing through Northtec, – a very well-rounded and thorough course. The interactive internet classroom worked brilliantly (once I conquered technophobia and actually realised how friendly the system is). The coursework is challenging and interesting and the tutors dedicated, helpful and very well informed.

Who are you most excited to meet at NorthWrite 2012?

I can’t pick one out. All of the presenters and their topics interest me and I’m looking forward to spending time among fellow writers. I’m hoping to use the atmosphere to kick start my own writing again after a hiatus spent juggling too many other balls (some rather heavy) and accidentally dropping my pen in the process.

What do you think of when you think of the ‘business’ of writing? What questions will you hope to have answered by the end of the conference?
‘The business of writing’ seems like a pun to me. On the one hand there is the art of creating – the part I really love – and the craft of editing and revision  – which also brings me enormous pleasure. But then there is The Business of the business of publication and promotion – which scares me into paralysis. I hope the conference will support the first part and offer physiotherapy for the second.

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Susie Fordyce

Hi Susie, where do you live?

Whangarei Heads

What kind of writing, reading and/or illustrating do you do yourself?

I started writing a long time ago then got involved in a career in local government having never dared to publish. Eight years ago I was diagnosed with epilepsy and my writing took off with alarming speed. I wrote poetry, letters, short stories, ideas for children’s books and a million other things! I hid them away still too afraid to share them. I did some poetry for epilepsy New Zealand and that was published in their newsletter. In reality I played at being a writer until last year when I lost my wonderful husband Stuart after a long fight against cancer. He made me promise to unearth my words and do something with them; so here I am!

What writing/illustration workshops have you previously attended in Northland? (Who taught them/ where did they take place/ when?)

I went to one in Kerikeri a couple of years ago with Daphne de Jong, Lesley Marshall and Susanna Lyle.

Who are you most excited to meet at NorthWrite 2012?

Other writers of any genre.

What do you think of when you think of the ‘business’ of writing?

An ability to turn off from the day to day living. To explore extremes; to debate internally with possibility and probability; to pretend; to play out vision; to act fantasy.

What questions will you hope to have answered by the end of the conference?

How do you overcome fear of critique; How can you make it a business; How do you develop the best support network; what’s marketable in today’s world of books; are e books taking over and do you need to write them differently…..?

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Greg Phillips

Hi Greg. Where do you live?

On a hill overlooking Shipwreck Bay, at the southern end of 90 Mile Beach, Ahipara, Northland.

What kind of writing, reading and/or illustrating do you do yourself?

I trained as an architect and a town planner, so I mostly write technical reports for work.  My mother was an art teacher, so I draw both for work and for pleasure.  At university I used to draw and/or paint brochures, booklets and murals both voluntarily and for compensation (mostly recompense with a degree of alcoholic content, in those days).  I have very catholic reading tastes – from scientific journals to Terry Pratchett and John le Carre.

What workshops have you signed up for?

I really enjoy David Hill’s columns in the Listener, so have enrolled for both Writing From Life’s Mistakes and Playing the Field.  Saturday morning I’m booked for Fifi Colston’s Illustration:  and on Sunday I’m also attending Grammar is Your Friend with Michelle Elvy and Zana Bell’s Preparing Your Manuscript for Publication.

What writing/illustration workshops have you previously attended in Northland? (Who taught them/ where did they take place/ when?)

Nothing previously.

Who are you most excited to meet at NorthWrite 2012?

I just enjoy meeting new people and learning new things, so I’m excited about the whole thing.

What do you think of when you think of the ‘business’ of writing? What questions will you hope to have answered by the end of the conference?

The Business of Writing is a concept with which I have had no experience, other than my own business of writing technical reports (where what you know is far more important than how well you write);  so anything I learn over the weekend will add to a feeling of ‘well-roundedness’ (which is a satisfying state for me).

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Kim Thomas

Hi, Kim. Where do you live?

Whangarei, in an old wooden house that creaks and groans a bit, a little like me.

What kind of writing, reading and illustrating do you do yourself?

Illustrating, forget it.  I love reading; pretty much anything except science fiction and fantasy.  I suppose that means I have limited imagination.  Now and again I uncover what little I have and write something.  I’m working, slowly, on a novel for children/young adults.  Recently I was introduced to flash fiction which is an exciting challenge.

What workshops have you signed up for?

Any that would have me.  Seriously, and I will be just that when attending said workshops: Historical Fiction, Writing from Life’s Mistakes, Grammar is Your Friend, Playing the Field, and Market Yourself and Your Book.  I am really looking forward to them all.

What workshops have you previously attended? (Who taught them/ where did they take place/ when?)

Two in Whangarei, both organised by the Whangarei Writers’ Workshop.  Diane Menefy ran one on short story writing, and the other was on Flash Fiction run by Michelle Elvy.  I have also attended, over the last couple of years, two or three weekend workshops in Auckland, run by Auckland University Continuing Education .  All – both those in Whangarei and in Auckland – were really worthwhile.

Who are you most excited to meet at NorthWrite 2012?

Other people who love reading and writing, lots of them I hope, from different backgrounds and with very different ideas.  I’m not hanging out to meet anyone in particular.

What do you think of when you think of the ‘business’ of writing? What questions will you hope to have answered by the end of the conference?

Putting writing centre stage in your life; turning up, tuning in, and churning it out.  I very much doubt I will find final answers to the central questions relating to my “writing life”.  Rather I’m looking to take my confidence yet another step forward.

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NorthWrite 2012 Wrap-Up

What a fantastic weekend! We had a lively panel discussion at the opening dinner on the topic of The Business of Writingwith some varied and contrasting points of view expressed. The overriding question seemed to be: do we write for ourselves, the market or money? Each view was expressed but ultimately we must all choose what The Business of Writing means to us as individuals so we can make the best use of our writing time.

The feedback on the weekend workshops has been overwhelming positive and many participants have commented on the great diversity of the presenters and how wonderful it was to have such high-calibre speakers available in the North to talk about writing and illustrating in all its shapes and forms.

An Evening with Deborah Challinor was a delightful look at a writer’s life and how she manages the ups and downs of creating best-sellers. Deborah is very witty and had us in stitches with some of her stories and comments.

A huge thank you to everyone who made this weekend possible from the NZ Society of Authors, Northland Branch members, our sponsors, our wonderful presenters and our enthusiastic attendees.

We will be featuring a few reviews from the participants over the coming week so watch this space.

NorthWrite 2012 Attendees in Fifi Colston’s Illustration Workshop

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NorthWrite 2012 Review
From the opening dinner on Friday night to the last workshop on Sunday afternoon we feasted on the generosity of, amongst others, Joe Bennett, Deborah Challinor, Fifi Colston, Paula Green, David Hill and Kyle Mewburn as they shared their experience and knowledge of The Business of Writing.
NorthWrite covered an impressive range of writing related topics from the cultural differences exposed in the grammar workshop to the whispered words of warning, ‘don’t give up your day job’ in the manuscript preparation workshop.  The enthusiasm of the presenters left us knowing that being a successful writer is possible – that there is a place ‘out there somewhere’ for our work.Greg writes technical papers, does technical drawings and attends technical conferences where conversations with presenters are rare and certainly not about photographing the Hundertwasser toilets in the dark! Fifi’s illustration workshop introduced him to a new use for computer drawing programmes.Thank you, everyone, who worked so hard tending what was a kernel of an idea early in the year, enabling it to grow into a two day writing festival which gave over eighty people the opportunity to learn so much from a group of wonderful and talented speakers.

Karen and Greg Phillips

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